Tennis Court Paint, Surfacing, Patching Products And Information

TENNIS COURT PAINT AND RESURFACING PRODUCTS & DIY RESOURCES

Our 100% acrylic tennis court paint and patching products, manufactured under our propriety brand, Environmental Sport Coatings are all commercial grade engineered with the do-it-yourselfer and parks departments in mind. Visit our Products Page to find what you need for your project and our DIY Resources Page for information, videos and instructions on how to paint (surface) and repair your court. Our staff of tennis court surfacing, repair and construction experts are always on call 7 days a week to help you.

Tennis Court Color Chooser Link   Link To Pickleball Color Choser

COURT REPAIR AND PAINTING PROFFESSIONALS ON STAFF FOR ORDERING AND TECHNICAL SUPPORT 

Court painting and repair is not rocket science, but it's not finger painting either.  Try to imagine a pallet load of tennis court paint and patching products sitting next to your court, purchased from a company with no support system in place to help when you have questions or issues.

  

Trust us, you WILL have questions and issues, and they will likely arise when you are in the middle of the work. And yes, especially Saturdays and Sundays. Our court surfacing and repair experts are on-call 7 days a week to provide real-time instruction and help you avoid costly, stressful, mistakes.  'Click here for the full list of Court Store benefits waiting for you'


SEE WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT US

 

Peggy Bucher - Thanks again for leading me through this crazy project. It is amazing what a coat of paint can do. I will be calling you in seven years. 

Tom Garner - Thank you to Mark Montemayor and The Court Store for meeting and exceeding all my expectations with your tennis court prepping and painting products and expertise! I recommend you at the highest level for all who are contemplating a tennis court painting project! 

Read more testimonials and see pictures of many of their completed court surfacing projects!

Please call us if you have any questions.  We are always here to help you determine what you need.  We love to talk tennis courts: (800) 983-1357 or (404) 915-8352

SHOULD YOU HIRE A CONTRACTOR TO PAINT AND REPAIR YOUR COURT OR DO IT YOURSELF?

Price is the primary reason people decide to tackle their own tennis court paint and repair projects, but there are many others.  Some do it because they love the challenge of “Do-it-yourself” projects.  Others are very meticulous and feel they can do a better job. Still others cannot find a court surfacing (painting) contractor in their area.  Most tennis court owners choose to hire a contractor to handle their projects “turn-key”.  Contractor pricing for tennis court paint and repair varies widely depending on the region of the U.S.  In most coastal areas you can save quite a bit by buying the materials and surfacing your own court.  Below is a table of approximate turn-key tennis court painting prices around the Country as well as DIY materials, tools, and shipping costs to do it yourself.


DIY MATERIALS COSTS AND TURN-KEY CONTRACTOR SURFACING PRICES AROUND THE U.S.

Number of Courts

DIY Materials, Tools & Shipping

Turn-Key N.E. U.S.  & California

Turn-Key S.E. & Midwest U.S.

Turn-Key S.W & N.W. U.S.

1 Court

$1,500.00 to $3,000.00

$8,000.00 to $16,000.00

$4,000.00 to $8,000.00

$6,000.00 to $10,000.00

2 Court Battery

$3,400.00 to $4,900.00

$12,000.00 to $24,000.00

$6,000.00 to $12,000.00

$9,000.00 to $15,000.00

3 Court Battery

$4,900.00 to $6,400.00

$17,400.00 to $34,000.00

$8,500.00 to $17,000.00

$13,000.00 to $22,800.00

4 Court Battery

$6,400.00 to $8,600.00

$23,800 to $45,500.00

$11,500.00 to $23,200.00

$17,000.00 to $28,400.00

 

DO YOU NEED SPECIAL SKILLS TO PAINT AND REPAIR YOUR COURT?  

First, let’s dispel the notion that this work requires a high level of training or skill.  Tennis court painting is not any more technically challenging than many common do-it-yourself projects.  If you have laid tile in your kitchen or patched and painted a wall you already have many of the technical skills needed.  Even if you have never done these related projects, with a little guidance from our experts and a few trade secrets revealed in our how-to articles and videos, your tennis court project will look like it was done by a pro. 

 

WILL YOU HAVE TIME TO PAINT AND REPAIR YOUR COURT?  

A tennis court is a large area, so painting the entire court it is somewhat physically demanding.  The saying, “How do you eat an elephant?  One bite at a time.”, applies here.  You can take multiple bites of your tennis court painting project elephant each day or you can take one small bite when you have a couple of hours on a sunny morning.  Your court project does not have to overwhelm you.  A typical court painting and patching project will take approximately 48 man-hours.

 

HOW LONG BETWEEN PAINTINGS (RESURFACING)?  

Tennis court resurfacing, the process of patching and repainting an existing tennis court, is usually done every 4 to 7 years.  Some do it more often.  Some wait 10 to 15 years to resurface their court.  Courts are generally resurfaced more often than every 4 years because they either receive very heavy usage or structurally, they require more frequent attention to issues such as large cracks and settlement.  The general reasons for waiting longer than 7 years are lack of funds or inattention.  After 7 years the court will begin to become an eyesore to the property.

 

THE PROFESSIONAL WAY TO INSPECT A TENNIS COURT FOR PAINTING, RESURFACING AND/OR REPAIR

The first step of your tennis court resurfacing project is “Inspection”, whether you plan to hire a tennis court contractor to do the work or do it yourself.  Once you have followed the inspection steps below, you will know exactly what your tennis court will need and can communicate intelligently with tennis court resurfacing and materials experts.  A thorough inspection and recording will allow you to proceed on to planning and pricing your tennis court resurfacing as a do-it-yourself project, or to provide local court contractors with the information needed for them to easily give you their best pricing for a turn-key job.

Wait for a good rain or flood your court with a garden hose:  Court resurfacing pros know the best way to inspect a court is within an hour of a heavy rain.  The gloss from the water reveals highs, lows and other imperfections that are more difficult to see when the court is dry.  Slight humps created by roots intruding onto the court are a good example of identifying high spots.  Standing water can best be identified one hour after flooding.  Therefore, the obvious first step to a thorough inspection of your court is to wait for a good soaking rain or flood the court with a garden hose.  Immediately after the court has been flooded, walk over every square foot of it, looking for any imperfections (except standing water).  You should have a big yellow crayon in hand to mark each area you think needs repair.  Don’t hesitate to write on the court where you want to be reminded of details of the problems. 

You should wait one hour after a good flooding to find and mark areas where water is standing.  The U.S.T.A. (United States Tennis Association) regulations state: any area holding water deep enough to cover a nickel (1/8” or greater), one hour after flooding, should be patched to eliminate or at least reduce the standing water.  In our industry these areas are called, “Bird-Baths”, oddly enough.  The U.S.T.A. is primarily interested in eliminating these Bird-Baths because they slow the drying of the surface after a rain, delaying resumption of play.  As a court owner, you should eliminate them because water standing on the surface for too long will allow mildew to flourish, creating a slip hazard when damp and eventually degrading the paint.  So, one hour after flooding, use your yellow crayon to mark around the outer edge of any Bird-Baths you find. 

NOTE:  If you plan to paint or resurface the court relatively soon, you should consider cleaning your court (including pressure washing if needed) before you perform the inspection steps above.  Cleaning with water will remove many of the markings.  Rain will erode them away after a month or so.

Once you have inspected the tennis court and marked the areas needing work, it’s a good practice to document these areas with a diagram and electronic pictures.  These will be invaluable to anyone you contact to either supply materials for your tennis court painting / resurfacing or for contractors to give you turn-key pricing.  If you would like a blank tennis court diagram for your notes, click on one of these links for one of ours: SINGLE COURT DIAGRAMTWO COURT BATTERY DIAGRAM.  They are free.  Pictures should include close-ups of the problem areas and a few half-court and full-court overview shots.  If you are taking pictures of areas that are rough, drop a coin in the close-ups for perspective.

Please call us if you have any questions.  We are always here to help you determine what you need.  We love to talk sport surfaces: (800) 983-1357 or (404) 915-8352e.